Admitting mistakes and taking ownership

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A few years ago, I was such a different person. One of the hardest things for me to do – was to admit my mistakes and say “sorry”. It made me feel extremely embarrassed and uncomfortable. Even when I had a sense of realization, I found it very difficult to actually say that.

Due to this, a lot of my fights, disagreements, and arguments would drag all along – sometimes for months. I just couldn’t give up my ego/ pride to admit I was wrong. It led to several cold wars and silent battles. I would just be too guilty to say the words “I made a mistake, I realize that. I am sorry. Will you please forgive me? What can I do it make it better?”ย I simply would run away from the situation or ignore it altogether.

Then, over the years – as I grew spiritually, emotionally and as a human; I made friends with my fears. Instead of avoiding and ignoring, I learned to take ownership of my mistakes and actions and not just that – anytime I had a realization that I did something wrong/ could have done things better or differently, I would admit it and ask for forgiveness. I started to value friendships and relationships much more than the sense of ego/ pride.

This one change in my attitude has transformed my life so much, for the better. I embraced humility. I became a more thoughtful person. I could empathize deeply and take ownership of my life.

At times, realization comes in retrospect. But, I make sure that as soon as I realize that what I did was not right, I am quick to admit, seek forgiveness and take lessons for change. I wear my heart on my sleeves and I am humble in my actions. I do not regret this transition. In fact, this is something I am very happy about. I am able to confess, confide, be vulnerable, be human. Afterall, it is human to err. I’m also quick to forgive, and forget. Sometimes without apologies. I don’t prolong fights, arguments or disagreements. If I feel I’ve done wrong, I do my best to make up for it. I make an effort. I try to make people in my life feel love. Feel special

Human life is short and fragile. Love with all your heart and never stop being kind. You Only Live Once, so just do it right โค #ChooseLove

19 thoughts on “Admitting mistakes and taking ownership

  1. Before I retired, I had a very small staff contingent and whenever things went wrong, I would sit down with them and say “I’ll expect perfection from you as soon as I can set the example. You are quite safe for the immediate future. I do however expect you to learn from your mistakes.”

    Admitting to our own flaws is simply part of growing up/maturing. Sadly, so many people never achieve that level of development. Those are probably the same people who do not grasp the concept that we should treat people in the same way that we would like to be treated. Great Post Himali.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Great post and very true. Learning to own your mistakes is the first step to being able to become a better person.. You have to admit and acknowledge that you did something wrong before you can even hope to change your behavior. It is a struggle but something I am continuously working on too..

    Liked by 1 person

  3. SMiLes I admire Your Strength In Facing Difficulties Head On And Oh God being on the Autism Spectrum plus Being An Empath is Really Rough Iโ€™ve Spent my Life Apologizing Being Clueless in Social
    Interaction Unspoken Rules
    Being the Energizer
    Bunny Has it Draw
    Backs as Strengths
    Will Actually Be Weaknesses in Different
    Environments itโ€™s Really
    Hard for all Folks to
    Be Different Iโ€™m
    Just Glad it Pains
    Me Enough to See that
    Others Feel some kind
    Of Harm Where Apologizing
    Is Easy But it does Mortify
    Me To Harm Others thatโ€™s
    Why I could never Be A Good Manager iโ€™ll do all the Work Before i send someone to
    Hell (Fire them)..๐Ÿ˜‡

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The more we love ourselves the easier it becomes Himali. Those inner fears bind our emotions to those actions, they are our coping strategies. Our fears are a lifelong lie we have believed, and in understanding them the truth is laid bare and they now lose their power over us. And in that understanding we forgive ourselves and others because we can now see why we have all reacted the way we did.
    It is a hard journey, but in finally understanding ourselves a greater love we cannot give…to us…which we then naturally give out to others โค๏ธ ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿฝ

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  5. I think one of the biggest fears that go along with saying I’m sorry is that it may appear as a weakness while in fact, it is one of the greatest strengths one can develop. You are an immensely steadfast woman, Himali ๐Ÿ’–

    Liked by 2 people

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